Pelvic Floor Disorder

The pelvic floor is the area of the pelvis containing muscles, ligaments and connective tissue. The pelvic floor provides support for women’s internal organs such as the bladder, uterus, vagina, and rectum, and plays a key role in making sure these organs function properly.

Pelvic floor disorder occurs when muscles or connective tissues in the pelvic region become weak, too tight or injured. You may experience urine or bowel leakage when these muscles are weak. Your physiotherapist can provide non-surgerical options such as biofeedback, muscle stimulation, bladder training or relaxation techniques.

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If you’re a man with what feels like pain in your pelvic area, you probably feel like you’re in trouble. You have a musculoskeletal problem in an area that no one wants to touch (including you, because it reminds you too much of the dreaded prostate exam when you turn 40). But this is exactly […]
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By Lisa Flanders, PT I’m a physiotherapist who works in women’s health. A lot of what we do is help patients with pelvic floor dysfunction, which happens when the “sling” or “hammock” that supports the pelvic organs is not functioning in an optimal manner.
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