Fractures

A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open or compound fracture. Fractures commonly happen because of accidents, falls or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the bone.

After a fracture, your physiotherapist will make sure you are given the correct exercises to ensure that you regain maximum range of motion, strength and flexibility

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Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition that results in loss of bone mass and weakening of the bones, increasing the risk of fractures, such as a broken hip, crushed vertebra (spine), or fractured wrist. Osteoporosis-related fractures are often called fragility fractures because they happen with little or no trauma.

Soccer players young and old are ready to head out to the pitch for another action packed and fun-filled season. The world's most popular sport continues to grow across Canada, in particular amongst those aged 25 and under.

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Hot and Cold Treatment for Sprains and Strains

I’ve injured myself. Should I use hot or cold? Download CPA's infosheet to learn more.
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Walking Aids

Your health condition, size and age are key considerations when selecting a walking aid along with comfort, ease of use, stability and safety. Download CPA's infosheet to learn more about how physiotherapy can help.
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Waiting for imaging

A lot of people think we need imaging and doctor referrals to find out what is wrong with us, but the truth is a physiotherapist can get to the root of the problem by looking at you and how you move.

Pain will affect the way you move. The way you move will affect your pain. It can be a vicious cycle.

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Running From Injuries

As a physiotherapist with a passion for running, I am always looking for opportunities to educate fellow runners on how to avoid injuries
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For less time in physio rehab, try ‘prehabilitation’

From the Globe and Mail - what if you could gaze into a crystal ball that could predict your injuries before they happen
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Helping the elderly get back on their feet

there could be various reasons behind a fall among the elderly

Respond to the first fracture; prevent the second

Physiotherapy rehabilitation aims to optimize patient function and well-being

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Are you functionally fit?

It could be that while you're getting plenty of physical activity, you're not attending to your functional fitness needs
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Falls

Falling in older age is not uncommon and can have devastating consequences